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Wholesome! - Organic Molasses - 32 oz.
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  • Non-GMO
    Non-GMO

    Products free of organisms that have been created through genetic engineering.

  • BPA-Free
    BPA-Free

    Products and packaging that are free of the chemical bisphenol-a.

  • Fair Trade
    Fair Trade

    Food or crafts that are produced under standards designed to prevent and end poverty, sweatshop labor conditions, and environmental degradation.

  • Vegan
    Vegan

    Products contain no animal or animal by-products which include flesh, bones, dairy, eggs, honey, fur, leather, wool or down feathers.

  • Eco Friendly
    Eco Friendly

    Products that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits while protecting public health and environment.

Wholesome! - Organic Molasses - 32 oz.

Good Source of Calcium & Iron
Item #: 72476
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Wholesome! - Organic Molasses - 32 oz.

  • Item# :72476
    UPC# :012511700003
  • Brand:Wholesome!
  • Size/Form:32  oz.
  • Ship Weight:3.10
  • Servings:64
  • Dosage:1  Tablespoon(s)

Wholesome! - Organic Molasses Unsulphured - 32 oz.

Wholesome! Organic Molasses Unsulphured is a blackstrap molasses with a rich, full-bodied robust flavor that adds natural color and opulent caramel molasses tones in recipes. Wholesome! Organic Molasses Unsulphured is especially good in molasses cookies, in other baked goods, breads, sauces, BBQ sauces and in marinades. Wholesome! Organic Molasses Unsulphured can be used as a one-for-one replacement for refined blackstrap molasses.

Wholesome! Organic Molasses Unsulphured is actually the end product, or by-product, of the production of their Organic Sugar. Wholesome! Organic Molasses Unsulphured is loaded with vitamins, minerals and trace elements naturally present in the sugar cane plant and is a good source of iron, vitamin B6, potassium, calcium and magnesium. .
 


FAQ

What does "Certified Organic" mean?
"Certified Organic" means the item has been grown according to strict uniform standards that are verified by independent state or private organizations. Certification includes inspections of farm fields and processing facilities, detailed record keeping and periodic testing of soil and water to ensure that growers and handlers are meeting the standards which have been set.

Why buy Organic?
Organic products offer many benefits from a health and environmental aspect. When you buy certified organic food and products, your dollars cast a vote for a healthier planet.

Ten Good Reasons To Buy Organic:

  1. Organic products meet stringent standards. Organic certification is the public's assurance that products have been grown and handled according to strict procedures without persistent chemical inputs.
  2. Organic food tastes great! It's common sense: Well-balanced soils produce strong, healthy plants that become nourishing food for people and animals.
  3. Organic production reduces health risks. Many EPA-approved pesticides were registered long before extensive research linked these chemicals to cancer and other diseases. Organic agriculture is one way to prevent any more of these chemicals from getting into the air, earth and water that sustain us.
  4. Organic farms respect our water resources. The elimination of polluting chemicals and nitroglycerin fertilizers, done in combination with soil conservation, protects and conserves water resources.
  5. Organic farms build healthy soil. Soil is the foundation of the food chain. A primary focus of organic farming is to protect and build healthy soils.
  6. Organic farmers work in harmony with nature. Organic farmers respect the balance demands of a healthy ecosystem: wildlife is encouraged by using permanent pastures, utilizing buffer zones, planting wildlife refuges and by protecting wetlands, forest and other natural areas.
  7. Organic producers are leaders in innovative research. Organic farmers have led the way, largely at their own expense, with innovative on-farm research aimed at reducing pesticide use and minimizing agriculture's impact on the environment.
  8. Organic producers strive to preserve diversity. The loss of a large variety of species (biodiversity) is one of the most pressing environmental concerns. The good news is that many organic farmers and gardeners have been collecting and preserving seeds, and growing unusual varieties for decades.
  9. Organic farming helps keep rural communities healthy. The USDA reported that in 1997, half of US farm production came from only 2% of farms. Organic agriculture can be a lifeline for small farms because it offers an alternative market where sellers can command fair prices for crops.
  10. Organic abundance: Foods and non-foods alike! Now every food category has an organic alternative. And non-food agricultural products are being grown organically - even cotton, which most experts felt could not be grown this way.

Are Wholesome! organic products certified?
Yes, all Wholesome! organic products are certified organic by Quality Assurance International. These products are produced in accordance with the USDA's Natural Organic Program and they display the USDA logo on all their organic sweetener products.

Are your products GMO-Free?
Yes, Wholesome Sweeteners' products are processed and produced free of any genetically modified organisms (GMO).

Do organic farmers ever use pesticides?
Prevention is the organic farmer's primary strategy for disease, weed and insect control. By building healthy soils, organic farmers find that healthy plants are better able to resist disease and insects. Organic producers often select species that are well adapted for the climate and therefore resiste disease and pests. When pest populations get out of balance, growers will try various options like insect predators, mating disruption, traps and barriers. If these fail, permission may be granted by the certifier to apply botanical or other nonpersistent pest controls under restricted conditions. Botanicals are derived from plants and are broken down quickly by oxygen and sunlight.

Can any type of agricultural product become certified organic?
Yes, any agricultural product that meets third party or state certification requirements may be considered organic. Organic foods are becoming available in an impressive variety including pasta, prepared sauces, frozen juices, frozen meals, milk, ice cream and frozen novelties, cereals, meta poultry, breads, soups, chocolate, cookies, beer, wine, vodka and more. These foods, in order to be certified organic, have all been grown and processed according to national organic standards and must maintain a high level of quality. Organic fiber products, too, have moved beyond t-shirts, and include bed and bath linens, tablecloths, napkins, cosmetic puffs, feminine hygiene products and clothing.

Who regulates the certified organic claims?
The federal government set standards for the production, processing and certification or organic food in the Organic Food Production Act of 1990 (OFPA). The National Organic Standards Board was then established to develop guidelines and procedures to regulate all organic crops. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) during December 2000 unveiled detailed regulations to implement OFPA. These took effect on April 21, 2001, with an 18-month implementation period ending October 2002. At that time, any food labeled organic must meet these national organic standards. USDA's National Organic Program oversees the program.

How will purchasing organic products help keep our water clean?
Conventional agricultural methods can cause water contamination. Beginning in May 1995, a network of environmental organizations, including the Environmental Working Group, began testing tap water for herbicides in cities across the United States' Corb Belt, and in Louisiana and Maryland. The results revealed widespread contamination of tap water with many different pesticides at levels that present serious health risks. In some cities, herbicides in tap water exceed federal lifetime health standards for weeks or months at a time. The organic farmer's elimination of polluting chemicals and nitrogen leaching, in combination with soil building, works to prevent contamination and protects and conserves water resources.

Does Wholesome! use animal by-products in the production of its products?
Wholesome! Fair Trade Certified Organic and Natural Sugars (including Organic Sugar, Organic Sucanat, Light and Dark Brown Sugars, Turbinado, Powdered Sugar, Raw Cane Sugar, Natural Cane Sugar), Organic Blue Agave nectars, and Organic Syrups are made without animal by-products. Wholesome Sweeteners' Fair Trade Organic Honeys are, of course, produced by bees.

How do I use Organic Sugar in baking?
Use the Organic Sugar as a one-for-one replacement for refined white sugar in all of your recipes. It is perfect for baking, sprinkling on cereals and for use in hot and cold beverages.

What is a common sugar?
Common sugars, glucose, fructose and sucrose, are also carbohydrates--fuel for our bodies. They are made up of carbon ("carbo-"), hydrogen ("hydr") and oxygen, and in fact, they share the same chemical formula, C6H12O6. Carbohydrates are produced by ALL living things (plants and animals) for the storage of energy. And let's face it: We need carbs to function. They provide the energy for our brains, for our muscles, for our cardio-vascular system. Common sugars are the most concentrated source of carbs, or energy, we have, second only to fats and oils.

Plants and animals, including, of course, humans, put these carbs to use in two ways:

  • Storage of chemical energy in the form of calories (4 cal/gram)
  • Building blocks for our cells.

Carbs sometimes get a bad rap. They shouldn't. They are important to our bodies' function. Carbs in balance are not a problem, per se; carbs out of balance are a big problem. Lately some people have been eating more synthetically produced carbs than their bodies can use. The excess is stored as fat.

While sugars offer us so much in biochemical terms, we most often think about sugars as sweet things that make every day better. Sweetness helps mask undesirable flavors (it was used to administer medicines during the Middle Ages). It also enhances our perception of food aromas, perhaps by signaling to the brain that the food is a good energy source.

Besides providing energy to our bodies and sweetening the foods we eat, sugar provides texture as well.

  • It forms a sticky matrix that binds food particles together. It has a strong affinity for water, it dissolves easily and bonds quickly to water molecules so it helps keep baked good moist. It helps tenderizes flour's gluten in baked goods and softens proteins in custards and creams.
  • When heated (or caramelized), it changes color as it changes in flavor--from pale and sweet, to browner and acidic, to darker and bitter, adding visual and olfactory appeal.

The Common Sugars: Glucose, Fructose & Sucrose

Glucose: Simple sugar or monosaccharide/C6H12O6 (aka: dextrose)

Living cells get most of their energy from glucose. It's a basic building block for starches and is commonly derived from corn and rice, but it's also in many fruits and honeys. It's Always combined with other sugars (especially fructose). Alone, glucose metabolizes quickly, flooding the system with energy, then dissipating. (Some folks experience this as a blood sugar spike.) When glucose is combined with other common sugars, the other sugars help sustain its benefits.

Compared to other common cooking sugars (sucrose and fructose), glucose:

  • Is the least sweet
  • Is slow to taste sweet, peaks at about half the sweetness of sugar and lingers.
  • Is less soluble in water
  • Produces a thinner solution
  • Caramelizes at 300° F/150°C
  • Crystallizes, given enough time and the right temperature

Fructose: Simple sugar or monosaccharide/C6H12O6

Fructose, the common sugar, is vastly different from the manufactured high fructose corn syrup we've heard so much about lately. Like glucose, fructose is found in many fruits and honey. Fructose has the same chemical formula as glucose, but it's organized differently, and that makes all the difference. Most importantly, fructose metabolizes slowly, providing a "timed release" of energy.

Compared to other common cooking sugars fructose:

  • Is the sweetest of the common sugars
  • Our tastebuds recognize its sweetness quickly and strongly, but it fades quickly without a lingering aftertaste
  • Is most soluble in water (4 parts fructose will dissolve in 1 part water)
  • Begins to caramelize at 220° F/105° C
  • Doesn't crystallize when it's the dominant common sugar.

Fructose's sweetness varies depending on temperature. Its structure actually changes when heated or cooled. It's sweetest in cold solutions, but only about half as sweet in warm solutions (140° F/60° C).

Sucrose: Compound sugar or disaccharide/Glucose+Fructose (a.k.a table sugar)

Green plants produce sucrose in the process of photosynthesis and it's found in sugar cane and sugar beets. Sucrose offers us the most useful combination of properties:

  • It's not as sweet as fructose, but sweeter than glucose
  • It's less soluble than fructose, but more soluble than glucose
  • It takes just a bit of time for our tastebuds to detect sucrose's sweetness, then we enjoy the flavor a little longer
  • 2 parts of sucrose can dissolve in 1 part water (Produces the most viscosity or thickness in a water solution)
  • Begins to melt at 320°F/160°C and begins to caramelize at 340°F/170°C

What is fructose?
Fructose (C6H12O6), the common sugar, is a monosaccharide. Like glucose, fructose is found in many fruits and honey. It is the common sugar found in Wholesome Sweeteners Organic Blue Agave. Fructose is a naturally occuring fruit sugar that metabolizes slowly, providing a "timed release" of energy. It's the same type of sugar found in an apple.

Compared to other common cooking sugars fructose:

  • Is the sweetest of the common sugars
  • Our tastebuds recognize its sweetness quickly and strongly, but it fades quickly without a lingering aftertaste
  • Is most soluble in water (4 parts fructose will dissolve in 1 part water)
  • Begins to caramelize at 220° F/105° C, a much lower temperature than other common sugars
  • Doesn't crystallize.

Fructose's sweetness varies depending on temperature. Its structure actually changes when heated or cooled. It's sweetest in cold solutions, but only about half as sweet in warm solutions (140° F/60° C). Please note: Fructose is vastly different from the manufactured high fructose corn syrup we've heard so much about lately.

What is glucose?
Living cells in plants and animals get most of their energy from glucose (C6H12O6), a monosaccharide. It's a basic building block for starches and is commonly derived from corn and rice, but it's also in many fruits and honeys. It's always combined with other sugars (especially fructose). Alone, glucose metabolizes quickly, flooding the system with energy, then dissipating. (Some folks experience this as a blood sugar spike.) When glucose is combined with other common sugars, the other sugars help sustain its benefits.

Compared to other common cooking sugars (sucrose and fructose), glucose:

  • Is the least sweet
  • Is slow to taste sweet, peaks at about half the sweetness of sugar and lingers.
  • Is less soluble in water
  • Produces a thinner solution
  • Caramelizes at 300° F/150°C
  • Crystallizes, given enough time and the right temperature

What is sucrose?
Green plants produce sucrose in the process of photosynthesis and it's found in sugar cane and sugar beets. Sucrose is the basic building block of crystallized and granulated sugars. A combination of fructose and glucose (and therefore a disaccharide), sucrose brings us the best of both.

  • It's not as sweet as fructose, but sweeter than glucose
  • It's less soluble than fructose, but more soluble than glucose
  • It takes just a bit of time for our tastebuds to detect sucrose's sweetness, then we enjoy the flavor a little longer
  • 2 parts of sucrose can dissolve in 1 part water (Produces the most viscosity or thickness in a water solution)
  • Begins to melt at 320°F/160°C and begins to caramelize at 340°F/170°C

Why is Wholesome! Organic Sugar not pure white?
Their Organic Sugar is produced without the use of chemicals or decolorizing agents. Some of the sugar canes' natural molasses remains in and around the sugar crystals as they form. It is the retention of this natural molasses that gives the Organic Sugar its warm honey color and mellow flavor.

Are Wholesome! sugars produced from sugar cane or sugar beet?
All their organic and natural sugars are produced from sugar cane (Saccharum Officinarum).

Are Wholesome! products Kosher certified?

Wholesome! Kosher products include:

  • Organic Fair Trade Sugar
  • Organic Fair Trade Sucanat
  • Organic Turbinado
  • Organic Fair Trade Light Brown Sugar
  • Organic Fair Trade Dark Brown Sugar
  • Organic Fair Trade Powdered Sugar
  • Fair Trade Raw Cane Sugar
  • Fair Trade Natural Cane Sugar
  • Organic Zero
  • Organic Fair Trade Molasses
  • Organic Light Blue Agave
  • Organic Raw Blue Agave

How do you guarantee the quality of Wholesome Sweeteners products?
Wholesome Sweeteners suppliers are closely vetted for quality, organic certification and social responsibility in addition to any Fair Trade or Raw Food claims where applicable. We hold ourselves and our suppliers to the highest standards. After all, those are the standards and values that have built the success of our business.
Wholesome's Executive and Operations teams routinely visit the our producers fields and mills, watching as it is planted, harvested and processed. In addition to regular inspections by Quality Assurance International and Fair Trade Labelling Organizations, Wholesome's Chief Operating Officer and Corporate Quality Assurance Manager have audited cooperatives, farms and the processes.

What is organic?
Organic refers to the way agricultural products - food and fiber - are grown and processed. Organic food production is based on a system of farming that maintains and replenishes soil fertility without the use of toxic and persistent pesticides and fertilizers. Organic foods are minimally processed without artificial ingredients, preservatives or irradiation to maintain the integrity of the food.

How much sugar does an acre of cane produce?
While there are many environmental conditions that impact every harvest, in general, an acre of organically cultivated cane will yield 3 to 3.5 metric tons (6,500 to 7,500 lbs) of organic sugar. As a rule, about 10% of the harvest is saved and replanted. And every few years, the cane fields are intercropped with legumes (peas, etc) to restore nutrients to the soil. It depends on the region, but organically grown sugar cane yields tend to be about 70-80% of conventional cane cultivation and the subsequent sugar yield is about 90%.

Is there an official definition of "organic"?
The following excerpt is from the definition of "organic" that the National Organic Standards Board adopted in April 1995: "Organic agriculture is an ecological production management system that promotes and enhances biodiversity, biological cycles and soil biological activity. It is based on minimal use of off-farm inputs and on management practices that restore, maintain and enhance ecological harmony."

Are all organic products completely free of pesticide residues?
Certified organic products have been grown and handled according to strict standards without toxic and persistent chemical inputs. However, organic crops are inadvertently exposed to agricultural chemicals that are now pervasive in rain and ground water due to their overuse during the past fifty years in North America, and due to drift via wind and rain.

Is organic food better for you?
There is no conclusive evidence at this time to suggest that organically produced foods are more nutritious. Rather, organic foods and fiber are spared the application of toxic and persistent insecticides, herbicides, fungicides and fertilizers. Many EPA-approved pesticides were registered long before extensive research linked these chemicals to cancer and other diseases. In the long run, organic farming techniques provide a safer, more sustainable environment for everyone.

Why does organic food sometimes cost more?
Prices for organic foods reflect many of the same costs as conventional items in terms of growing, harvesting, transportation and storage. Organically produced foods must meet stricter regulations governing all these steps, so the process is often more labor and management intensive, and farming tends to be on a small scale. There is also mounting evidence that if all the indirects costs of conventional food production - cleanup of polluted water, replacement of eroded soils, costs of health care for farmers and their workers - were factored into the price of food, organic foods would cost the same, or more likely, be less expensive.

Isn't organic food just a fad?
No. US sales of organic food totaled $5.4 billion in 1998, about $6.5 billion in 1999, and reached nearly $7.8 billion in 2000. The market has grown 20%-24% annually during the 1990s. The adoption of national standards for certification is expected to open up new markets for US organic producers. \

How do I read the codes on the package?
The codes on Wholesome Sweeteners sugar bags are simply internal codes that identify each package's packaging date and location. (Sugar has an indefinite shelf-life.)

What is the difference between Blackstrap Molasses and Barbados Molasses?
Wholesome Sweeteners Organic Unsulphured Molasses is a vitamin rich by-product of the sugar-making process. When freshly cut sugar cane is processed, the sucrose, or sugar, is literally spun from the molasses. In addition to guaranteed Organic and Fair Trade certifications, Wholesome's minimal refining processes provides a sweeter molasses flavor than commercially available Blackstrap Molasses. Barbados, or Light, Molasses contains a higher concentration of sucrose. (Note: Sugar beet molasses is unpalatable to humans--it is very bitter--and is mostly used as cattle feed.)

Are Wholesome! products appropriate for someone who has candida?
While our sweeteners are appropriate for so many people, we're sorry to report that our products are not suitable for persons being treated for candida or other yeast-related conditions. Candida feeds on sugar and sugar alcohols (meaning these should also be avoided).

Are Wholesome! products good for someone with cancer?
Because conditions vary from patient to patient, we respectfully defer to a patient's physician, nutritionalist or treatment team for advice on consuming sweeteners of any kind.

Fairtrade & Social Responsibility
Wholesome! holds fast to a "Fair Trade, Not Aid" philosophy. Wholesome pioneered Fairtrade certification for sweeteners and in so doing, fostered ever-widening agricultural and community development programs while providing stable economic resources for our cooperative partners in developing countries. They have created a viable economic incentive to protect communities, traditions and the environment. This means that farmers can compete against factory farms, keep their land (and buy more), send their kids to school, develop the quality of their crops and build community resources.

Fairtrade Certified is their guarantee that they pay the farmers a set premium for their crops. The money is wired directly from their accounts to the cooperatives' accounts in Costa Rica, Malawi, Mexico and Paraguay.

Since the last quarter of 2005, when Wholesome Fairtrade Certified the granulated sugar line, they have paid more than $7.5 million in social premiums to their cooperative partners (the social premium is paid above and beyond the market price paid for the sugar).

Fairtrade Certified means:

  • Farmers receive a fair price: Democratically organized farmer groups (called cooperatives) receive a guaranteed minimum price and an additional social premium for certified organic products. Farmer organizations are also eligible for pre-harvest credit.
  • Fair labor conditions: Workers on Fair Trade farms enjoy freedom of association, safe working conditions, and living wages. Forced child labor is strictly prohibited.
  • Direct trade: With Fair Trade, importers purchase from Fair Trade producer groups as directly as possible, eliminating unnecessary middlemen and empowering farmers to develop the business capacity necessary to compete in the global marketplace.
  • Democratic and transparent organizations: Fair Trade farmers and farm workers decide democratically how to invest Fair Trade revenues.
  • Community development: Fair Trade farmers and farm workers invest Fair Trade premiums in social and business development projects like scholarship programs, quality improvement trainings, and organic certification.
  • Environmental sustainability: Harmful agrochemicals and GMOs are strictly prohibited in favor of environmentally sustainable farming methods that protect farmers' health and preserve valuable ecosystems for future generations.

Who plays...and how?

  • The Farmers & Cooperatives agree to grow crops and produce goods in keeping with specific social and environmental standards.
  • Fairtrade International & Fair Trade Labelling Organizations International, 3rd party certifiers make sure that agreements made are kept-by all parties. TransFair also offers programs to cooperatives that help them develop business acumen and promotes the Fair Trade message in the US.
  • Importers (including Wholesome Sweeteners) pay the farmers cooperatives directly according to prices set through international agreements.
  • Consumers who now more than ever express their social and environmental values by supporting the farmers and companies responsible for bringing Fair Trade Certified products into the market.

Look for the Fairtrade Certified logo

It's the only independent, third-party consumer guarantee that companies have complied with strict, audited economic, social and environmental criteria for particular products, and are creating a more equitable and sustainable trade system for producers.

Social Benefits of Fair Trade

Fair Trade Certified cooperative members are generally very small producers managing their farm with their own and their family's labor-force. Their farming operations are small, but solid. They just need a little help moving into the global marketplace. Fair Trade provides opportunities for the social and economical development of ALL of the members. Each person has a voice in the cooperative's investments and programs. When consumers see a product with the Fair Trade Certified label, they are guaranteed that farmers received a fair price and all of the other benefits of the fair trade system.

Organic & Natural: Our Environmental Responsibility

Wholesome!'s Green Rule
Wholesome Sweeteners' ethos is shaped by a deep concern for the long-term health of the planet and all of its inhabitants. They believe in sustainability, traditionally made artisanal products and a very light footprint. It's a big job, but they're making progress.

They strongly believe in the importance of sustainable and organic agriculture; not only to provide the best-tasting, highest quality sugars but also to encourage a safe and beautiful future for the planet.

  • They ensure that all their employees and those of their suppliers are fairly remunerated against industry norms. They also ensure that their suppliers' employees/farmers have access to welfare and social programs that include healthcare, education and self-determination.
  • Protection of Children: They will not employ children nor will they knowingly permit their suppliers to employ children in the harvesting, processing or production of any of the products they buy from them.

They use traditional methods...

  • From the seed stock to harvest, their sugar cane is cultivated by hand and grown without synthetic fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides
  • Wherever possible, they work with Fair Trade Certified farmers cooperatives
  • At the small mills, their products are made simply and the spent sugar cane or blue agave remnants, called bagasse, are recycled as fuel to generate electricity for the mill and nearby villages.

About Wholesome!
Wholesome!, formed in 2001, is the nation's leading provider of sustainable, environmentally and ethically responsible, great tasting sweeteners in the USA. The sweeteners are Organic, Fairtrade Certified, Non-GMO Verified, highest quality sugars, syrups, and honeys, all made from nature's best resources.

Wholesome! pioneered the certification process for Fairtrade Certified sugar and honey in the USA in 2005 and 2008 respectively. The Fairtrade Certification guarantees farmers receive a fair price for their crops plus an additional premium payment that is democratically used to benefit the community. Wholesome Sweeteners has paid more than $8.5 million in social premiums to benefit our Fairtrade partners, farming and beekeeping cooperatives in the developing world.

The Company has grown to become a recognized leader in socially and environmentally responsible business practices and products. Over 60 new products have been developed during the last 10 years and they are the first choice for many notable chefs and consumer good-food advocates alike. Wholesome Sweeteners is the leading brand of organic sweeteners in grocery stores and the leading supplier of organic sweeteners to food companies as an ingredient.

In March of 2012, Arlon Group, a private equity firm based in New York, focused on food and agriculture, in partnership with Wholesome! management and Edward Billington & Son, acquired a significant stake in Wholesome Sweeteners. Arlon led the buyout of Wholesome! alongside Billington, Wholesome! management and several other investors. Imperial Sugar Company sold all shares to the investor parties. Billington's continuing involvement, along with the retention and increased ownership stake of Wholesome! management, guarantees continuity of the consumer focused philosophy and entrepreneurial culture.

Arlon Group invests in middle market companies across all stages of the food and agriculture supply chain, including production, processing, distribution, food service and retail. It seeks to achieve attractive long-term returns by combining its well-developed investment process in the food and agriculture sectors with the strategic insight of an experienced industry participant. Arlon Group believes that its long-term perspective, food sector expertise, and commitment to partnering with management teams make it a strong partner to food businesses that are pursuing stable growth.

Edward Billington's & Son's is a diverse, international foods and agriculture group. It is one of Britain's largest, privately owned family businesses, recognized for quality, service and innovation. Established in 1858, it has more than 150 years of knowledge and experience in organic and all-natural farming and extensive expertise in sourcing the finest quality sugars across the globe. In 1992, Billington's was the first company in the world to bring a certified organic sugar to market.

With new ownership, Wholesome! will continue to remain focused on providing their customers with the highest quality, most ethically sourced and fairly traded sustainable sweeteners.

Wholesome! Mission

  • To supply only the finest organic and natural sugar products from ethically and environmentally responsible growers and manufacturers;
  • To provide consumers with the choice of safe, flavorful, organic and natural sugars that are produced with respect for the environment, human welfare, food safety and the health and nutritional needs of consumers' families;
  • To be the premier supplier of added-value natural and organic sweeteners to retail, foodservice and industrial food manufacturing markets of North America.

The bold flavor is delicious in cookies, gingerbread, baked beans, BBQ sauces, marinades and more.


Wholesome Sweeteners - Organic Molasses Unsulphured - 32 oz.
Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Tbsp. (20 g)
Servings Per Container: 65
Amount Per Serving %DV*
Calories 60
Sodium 15 mg 1%
Potassium 300 mg 9%
Total Carbohydrate 14 g 5%
Sugars 10 g
Protein <1 g
Calcium 10%
Vitamin B6 8%
Magnesium 10%
Iron 20%
Zinc 1%
*Percent daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients: Organic Blackstrap Molasses
14141 Southwest Freeway, Suite 160
Sugar Land, TX,
Phone: 1-800-680-1896 Visit website

About Wholesome!

At Wholesome!, we are committed to providing the most delicious Fair Trade Certified, Organic, Natural and Non-GMO Project Verified sweeteners sourced from ethically and environmentally responsible growers and manufacturers. We provide safe and flavorful sweeteners that are produced with respect for food safety, the environment and human welfare.

We strongly believe in the importance of sustainable and organic agriculture to encourage a safe and beautiful future for the planet and its people. We believe protecting the environment through sustainable farming is critical to a healthy planet and healthy people. We believe that the farmers who feed the world every day deserve a fair price for the crops they grow.

Average Rating

5
32 rating(s)5 out of 5 stars
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Recommendation

100%32 out of 32 reviewers would recommend this product to a friend.
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5

By (Canoga Park , CA )

Unsulphured, Blackstrap and Organic. Excellent.

I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT!
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4

By (Maricopa , AZ )

I have been buying & enjoying this brand for awhile.

I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT!
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4

By (Montreal , Quebec / Quebec )

The molasses is excellent quality.

I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT!
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4

By (West McLean , VA )

I use it to make my EM cultures. Get good results.

I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT!
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5

By (Charlotte , NC )

Flavorful molasses can be used in most instances as other molasses.

I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT!
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Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed by contributors of the product reviews are their own and not necessarily those of LuckyVitamin.com. LuckyVitamin.com does not endorse or imply any medical claims from these reviews. These reviews should not be taken as recommendations but rather customer opinions of the products that they may or may not have used. Reviews are not intended as a substitute for appropriate medical care or advice and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Read the full product reviews disclaimer here.

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