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Heinz - Tomato Ketchup Reduced Sugar - 13 oz.

By Heinz
Item #: 136292
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Heinz - Tomato Ketchup Reduced Sugar - 13 oz.

  • Code#:136292
  • Manufacturer:Heinz
  • Size/Form:13  oz.
  • Packaged Ship Weight:1.05
  • Servings:23

Heinz - Tomato Ketchup Reduced Sugar - 13 oz. (369g)

Heinz Reduced Sugar Tomato Ketchup Satisfied Tastes and Appetites Around the World. People all over the world choose Heinz because their brands make mealtime an uncommonly good experience. Whether you’re at home, dining out or on the go, trust Heinz to bring something special to the table, every time. As The Good Food Company, they relish the challenge of continuing to create products that will become the world’s favorite foods. This means they are always adapting and engaging in cutting-edge research to continue their reputation as an innovative leader in the food industry. For example, they develop their own seeds to grow superior tomatoes to use in our foods. They also conduct some of the world’s most advanced research on Infant/Nutrition. They will always place the needs, health, safety and well-being of their consumers above all else.

Heinz Ketchup Frequently Asked Questions
Q:
Why 57 varieties?
A: In 1896, H. J. Heinz was inspired by an advertisement he saw for “21 styles of shoes.” Using what he considered to be a magic lucky number, Henry came up with the slogan “57 Varieties” despite the fact that the company offered more than 60 products at that time. Heinz today offers more than 5,700 quality products and is still known for “57 Varieties.”

Q: What happened to the famous gherkin pickle on the Heinz label?
A: Heinz Ketchup retired the pickle from its label after 110 years, making room for a vine-ripened tomato. This new label emphasizes Heinz’s heritage and our deep dedication to tomato quality, from seed to bottle.

Q: Do you still make green Ketchup?
A: No, they do not currently make green Ketchup (or any color other than red).

Q: Do you still make the glass bottle?
A: Yes, this bottle is still made and sold to restaurants. Look for it at many fine-dining establishments.

Q: At what speed does Ketchup exit the iconic glass bottle?
A: Heinz Ketchup exits the iconic glass bottle at .028 miles per hour. Thry know because it’s something they test in their quality assurance procedures. If the Ketchup they test comes out faster than this speed, that batch of Ketchup is rejected.

Q: What's the best way to get Heinz Ketchup out of the iconic glass bottle?
A: To release Ketchup faster from the glass bottle, apply a firm tap to the sweet spot on the neck of the bottle — the "57." Very few people know this secret. Now you’re “in-the-know.”

Q: Do I need to refrigerate Ketchup?
A: Because of its natural acidity, Heinz Ketchup is shelf-stable. However, its stability after opening can be affected by storage conditions. They recommend that this product, like any processed food, be refrigerated after opening. Refrigeration will maintain the best product quality after opening.

Q: Is Ketchup gluten-free?
A: Yes!

Q: What is the shelf life of an unopened bottle of Ketchup?
A: Fifteen months from production. Look for the “best by” on the cap or back of bottle.

Q: What is in “natural flavorings”?
A: The natural flavorings listed in our ingredient statement consist of natural spice extracts and oils. The exact ingredients included under the “natural flavorings” on the Heinz Ketchup label are considered proprietary, because recipes cannot be patented.

Q: Does your Ketchup contain MSG?
A: Heinz Ketchup does not contain monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Their Sustainability Mission
As the trusted leader in nutrition and wellness, Heinz – the original Pure Food Company – is dedicated to the sustainable health of people, the planet and their Company. Heinz has developed and implemented a universal Sustainability Process across businesses and borders in order to achieve their sustainability goals.

Their nine established goals established for achievement by 2015 include:

  • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 20%
  • Reducing energy consumption by 20%
  • Reducing water consumption by 20%
  • Reducing solid waste sent to landfill by 20%
  • Increasing use of renewable energy resources by 15%
  • Reducing packaging material by 15%
  • Reducing transportation fossil fuel consumption by 10%
  • Enhancing sustainable agriculture through a 15% reduction in carbon footprint, 15% reduction in water usage, and 5% increase in tomato crop yields
  • Increasing employee engagement

Understanding Their Material Issues
H.J. Heinz Company conducted a materiality analysis as part of the development of this report and in conjunction with their ongoing global Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategic planning efforts. Materiality analysis allows us to take a close and considered look at the CSR issues that are of the highest concern to their stakeholders and that could significantly affect their Company’s ability to execute its business strategy. In effect, the materiality analysis highlights areas both of opportunity and risk to help us refine their overall strategic reporting approach and improve performance.

What is a material issue?
They define material CSR issues as those that would likely have a significant impact on Heinz and are relevant to their key stakeholders. In conducting the analysis, they began with a comprehensive evaluation of stakeholder concerns. They reviewed both direct stakeholder input (as gathered through a focus group) as well as indirect source materials, including ratings and rankings surveys, investor questionnaires, peer reports, customer requirements, and trade association position statements, among others.

They also conducted an internal survey to determine company perceptions regarding the potential impact and importance of each issue included in the analysis. Issues were assessed and ranked according to several criteria, including, for example, potential impact on revenue, brand and reputation, employee engagement and their ability to deliver their products to customers. The resulting materiality matrix combines both stakeholder rankings and Company perceptions and depicts the relative reporting priority of their CSR issues (high priority issues are located in the upper right-hand corner of the matrix).

They have structured this report to provide enhanced information and deeper discussion of issues ranked as high priorities for their Company and their stakeholders. They expect to refine the materiality analysis in future years and welcome feedback from all stakeholders regarding the results of the analysis.

Use of the analysis
They have used this analysis to identify issues to cover in their Report. This analysis and the methods for conducting materiality analyses generally are works in progress and do not specifically reflect the views of Heinz management. In fact, Heinz is passionate about addressing all of the issues submitted to the materiality analysis. Sustainability issues are not discrete. Rather, they overlap and interconnect in a complex system that is difficult to capture in a list of issues. Analyzing issues by stakeholder group adds depth to their understanding of who is concerned about which issues and why, but in the process of placing them on a two-dimensional matrix, some of that nuance is lost. Finally, an element of subjectivity is inevitable.

Food Safety & Policy
To deliver on their trusted brand status, Heinz has implemented consistent, comprehensive global food safety management processes across their supply chain. This includes the application of their two internally designed risk management tools: their Quality Risk Management Process for controlling residual risk at factories and co-packers; and their Global Supplier Quality Management Program, which highlights and manages potential hazards throughout the supply chain. At the end of 2013, Heinz had approximately 5,500 suppliers that provided packaging and ingredients to Heinz, 68 Company-owned factories and 300 co-packers.

Global Quality Management Programs
Their global Supplier Quality Management program helps mitigate the risk associated with each ingredient that they procure and also allows us to categorize their suppliers based on risks posed. Based on these risk assessments, they determine the level of scrutiny to which each supplier is exposed. They have a trained, calibrated and competent team of supplier auditors based all around the world consistently enforcing Heinz standards. They measure compliance with this process to ensure that all suppliers are approved by quality and that everything they buy is covered by a written specification that is signed, understood and agreed by the supplier. They have been applying absolute rigor to the system and maintaining compliance levels at 100%.

They use their Quality Risk Management Process (QRMP) to drive consistent best practices at their factories and co- packers. This process is a proactive quality management system that focuses and directs activities at their factories and co-packers to control food safety hazards. This process is based on internal and externally recognized quality standards, including ISO 9001, ISO 2200 and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), a food safety risk assessment process focused on controlling biological, chemical and physical hazards within the food chain.

As their Company’s key Food Safety & Quality leading measure, this correlates well with their lagging measures of Product Recalls and Consumer Complaints. In order to continually improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their performance, a risk-based prioritized improvement plan is developed every year for each plant. In the past two calendar years, the food industry has seen the instance of public recalls rise. Heinz has improved their performance, experiencing only two recalls in the past four years.

Marketing Self-Regulation on Health & Nutrition
Heinz demonstrated their commitment to food safety by maintaining clear and accurate nutrition labeling on their products. Their focus on factual, transparent labeling included informing consumers about potential allergens as well as gluten-free products.

In the United States, Canada, Italy, Indonesia, New Zealand, China and India, all Heinz products carry the mandatory nutrition information. In the UK, in addition to the nutrition information, Heinz also includes salt equivalent labeling, and where space permits, Guideline Daily Amounts. In the Netherlands, Heinz committed to the Energy Logo Initiative which indicates the amount of calories per portion of product.

Charter for Marketing Breast-Milk Substitutes
The H.J. Heinz Company recognizes the importance and the superiority of breast-milk in feeding infants and young children. As is outlined in Company policy, Heinz has developed a worldwide charter of practice for marketing breast-milk substitutes consistent across Heinz Business Units. The aim is to support breast-feeding and to outline principles and requirements to provide safe and adequate nutrition for infants and young children, when breast-feeding cannot be (or cannot be entirely) provided.

Furthermore, as a member of the International Association of Infant Food Manufacturers [IFM], Heinz is committed to the IFM’s Rules of Responsible Conduct. Developed by the IFM to address stakeholder expectations regarding the Industry’s marketing practices for breast-milk substitutes, and introduced in January 2014, the Rules of Responsible Conduct relate to the marketing of breast-milk substitutes and follow-on formula for infants from birth up to the first twelve months of life (unless local law prescribes a different age), and are consistent with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines.

Lowering Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Heinz surpassed their 20% reduction target in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions two years before the target of April 2015. As a global food company, Heinz recognizes that climate change is a significant environmental concern and that reducing GHG emissions can help protect the planet. During the reporting cycle, they continued to evaluate innovative and sensible opportunities at their factories and within their Supply Chain to contribute to further reductions.

Through their Global Utility Optimization Program, Heinz assesses facilities in each of their business units and identifies potential energy-saving projects. In 2012 and 2013, Heinz employees continued to execute utility-focused factory assessments (Kaizen Events) at many of their facilities globally. The objective of these employee-led events was to identify and initiate opportunities to improve energy efficiency, which in turn can directly and indirectly help reduce GHG emissions. These assessments resulted in the following projects to drive improved energy utilization in their manufacturing facilities:

  • Boiler/steam optimization
  • Compressed air optimization
  • Process heat recovery
  • Water reclamation
  • Waste recycling optimization

An added benefit of these projects included a projected 2% to 4% reduction in energy/utility consumption per year per factory.

Global Utility Optimization Program
Global Utility Optimization (GUOP) is an integral process Heinz follows to save on energy, utilities, and costs both for the present and the future. In large plants, such as Muscatine Iowa and Fremont Ohio, their staff of engineers and environmental professions conduct assessments to determine where additional utility savings can be generated. In most cases, Heinz identifies several projects at each location which range from reusing hot and cold water, heated make up air, compressed air, steam condensate, essentially any form of energy. Once viable projects are identified estimated savings, project costs, and the simple payback are calculated. This information helps prioritize which projects to implement first. An example of a project in Muscatine, Iowa includes revising how the water in the hot well reclaim tank is utilized. Currently, there is some mixing of warm water with the hot water which negates the effectiveness of the energy reclaim. Their analysis indicates that by spending an estimated $50,000 an estimated savings of $62,000 would be realized over 9.6 months. This is just one example of several projects that are leveraged to save energy and optimize utility usage.

Decreasing Energy Consumption
In 2012 and 2013, Heinz moved closer to achieving their goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 20% globally by 2015. In factory after factory, their Sustainability Process continued to drive decreased energy consumption by installing new technologies and more efficient equipment and optimizing business and manufacturing processes. Their Global Utility Optimization Program, described in the Greenhouse Gas Emissions section, is one of the programs propelling progress in this important area.

Heinz has recognized that using less energy is not only better for the environment, it is smart business because it can help mitigate the financial impacts of rising energy costs. Their processes have also played a key role in reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and improving efficiency in their factories.

Increasing Renewable Energy
Heinz continued to evaluate potential opportunities to utilize renewable energy resources such as biofuels, solar power and wind. In 2013, the Company’s use of alternative energy improved from the baseline year but remained below target.

New technology included the installation of a biomass boiler at their Quero™ factory in Nerópolis, Brazil. The boiler, which uses sugar cane bagasse, eucalyptus chips and corn straw for fuel, helped the factory reduce its annual Greenhouse Gas Emissions per unit of production by approximately 60%. Heinz will continue to explore cost-effective renewable energy opportunities.

Reducing Solid Landfill Waste
At Heinz, every stage of their operations presents an opportunity to eliminate waste. They have been focused on finding many ways to reduce, reuse or recycle to divert solid waste from landfills. The Company has sought beneficial uses for all waste globally through their Sustainability Process, which taps a comprehensive network of Regional Sustainability Coordinators who share best practices in resource management and recycling with their facilities. Heinz already has surpassed their 20% goal for solid waste reduction, using 2005 as the baseline year. Their success in this area has been a direct result of their focus on best practice sharing.


Their focus on solid waste reductions has spanned from their North American operations to factories around the world. For example, their factory in Jacksonville, Florida implemented a recycling project that has diverted approximately 50% of its solid waste to recycling, the equivalent of 3.7 million pounds per year or 185 trips with the average garbage truck. This was accomplished by separating the trash into plastics, foils and routine trash waste streams. Heinz has achieved significant solid waste reductions elsewhere since 2005, including at these facilities:

  • Dundalk, Ireland: 92%
  • Utrecht, Netherlands: 91%
  • Kendal, UK: 89%
  • Worcester, UK: 89%
  • Ft. Myers, USA: 87%
  • Christchurch, New Zealand: 77%
  • Seclin, France: 74%
  • Guadalajara, Mexico: 72%
  • Elst, Netherlands: 72%
  • Jacksonville, USA: 66%
  • Alfaro, Spain: 65%
  • King Street, New Zealand: 61%
  • Cairo, Egypt: 60%
  • Dan Magot, Indonesia: 54%

Every Drop Matters
Water is a vital resource for all Heinz operations worldwide. It is needed to grow tomatoes and other crops, and it is a crucial resource for the manufacturing process. Heinz has implemented water conservation measures and evaluations globally to protect one of their earth’s most precious resources. Heinz surpassed their 20% target for water consumption reductions at their manufacturing facilities two years before the target of April 2015, using 2005 as the baseline year. Each facility has been required to reduce water consumption by 2% compared with the previous year and has been incentivized to reduce consumption 3% or higher.

Their success in water conservation was achieved through a wide range of actions that extended from recycling water and installing new technologies to upgrading water treatment plants. Heinz has tracked water savings through the measurement of incoming water and they continue to seek additional water conservation opportunities.

Making Better Nutrition a Global Priority
The keys to improving nutrient density include increasing fiber, protein, vitamins A and C, calcium and iron and reducing total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and total sugar. During the reporting cycle, Heinz evaluated many of their products to determine their nutrient density scores and identify opportunities for improvement.

The Company initiated this evaluation as a critical step toward aligning their products even more closely with accepted nutrient recommendations and guidelines for the daily consumption of total fat, saturated fat; trans fat, sodium and sugar, based on a recommended total daily diet of 2,000 calories.

Focus on Product Nutrition
During the reporting cycle, Heinz continued their focus on reducing total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and total sugar across their product lines under the direction of the Vice President of R&D and Quality.

A team of Heinz nutrition professionals was actively engaged with accredited scientific experts and regulatory bodies. Focusing on nutrient density and addressing ingredients of concern (particularly sodium, saturated fat and sugar/calories), they provided scientific data and information to the brand teams to proactively make health and wellness a key element in brand strategy.

The Company continues to operate Centers of Excellence in North America and Europe that are responsible for improving the nutritional profiles of Heinz products.

Food Safety & Policy
To deliver on their trusted brand status, Heinz has implemented consistent, comprehensive global food safety management processes across their supply chain. This includes the application of their two internally designed risk management tools: their Quality Risk Management Process for controlling residual risk at factories and co-packers; and their Global Supplier Quality Management Program, which highlights and manages potential hazards throughout the supply chain. At the end of 2013, Heinz had approximately 5,500 suppliers that provided packaging and ingredients to Heinz, 68 Company-owned factories and 300 co-packers.

Global Quality Management Programs
Their global Supplier Quality Management program helps mitigate the risk associated with each ingredient that they procure and also allows us to categorize their suppliers based on risks posed. Based on these risk assessments, they determine the level of scrutiny to which each supplier is exposed. They have a trained, calibrated and competent team of supplier auditors based all around the world consistently enforcing Heinz standards. They measure compliance with this process to ensure that all suppliers are approved by quality and that everything they buy is covered by a written specification that is signed, understood and agreed by the supplier. They have been applying absolute rigor to the system and maintaining compliance levels at 100%.

They use their Quality Risk Management Process (QRMP) to drive consistent best practices at their factories and co- packers. This process is a proactive quality management system that focuses and directs activities at their factories and co-packers to control food safety hazards. This process is based on internal and externally recognized quality standards, including ISO 9001, ISO 2200 and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), a food safety risk assessment process focused on controlling biological, chemical and physical hazards within the food chain.

Supplier Guiding Principles
One critical strategy to ensure the safety of their products is Heinz’s requirement that their domestic and international suppliers, co-packers and joint venture partners agree to comply with their Supplier Guiding Principles. These principles apply to all their suppliers and include complying with local labor and environmental laws to protect the health and safety of workers as well as the Earth. They seek suppliers’ compliance with these principles through contractual provisions and track their acceptance in proprietary software.

They have not had any instances of non-compliance with their suppliers. However, the Company continues to monitor these relationships. If an action of non-compliance should occur, Heinz is prepared take appropriate action on a case-by-case basis and work with suppliers to correct deficiencies or, if appropriate, terminate the relationship.

As their Company’s key Food Safety & Quality leading measure, this correlates well with their lagging measures of Product Recalls and Consumer Complaints. In order to continually improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their performance, a risk-based prioritized improvement plan is developed every year for each plant. In the past two calendar years, the food industry has seen the instance of public recalls rise. Heinz has improved their performance, experiencing only two recalls in the past four years.

Henry John Heinz: A Man of Uncommon Vision
Henry John Heinz was very much the product of his parents, and the lessons he learned from them echo down into the character of the H.J. Heinz Company today. Henry’s parents taught him thrift rather than greed. He knew nothing of “get rich quick” business schemes and couldn’t bear the thought of ill-gotten gain. Many of his business ideals and principles, almost unheard of at the time, remain progressive to this day. For example, Henry Heinz did business based on the simple idea that every profit should be fairly earned. One of his mottos still guides Heinz’s purchasing practices today: “Deal with the seller so justly that he will want to sell to you again.” Another driving principle of Henry Heinz’s that resonates in today’s resource-conscious world was his hatred of waste of any kind. Leading by example, he inspired each of his employees to avoid even the slightest waste of material, time or opportunity.

Finally, Henry Heinz learned from his mother a genuine and enduring concern and respect for every person, rich or poor, and always tried to practice her favorite rule for living: “Always remember to place yourself in the other person’s shoes.” Individually, the principles Henry Heinz instilled in his company can seem simple and almost quaint. Taken together though, they’re an all-too-rare combination in today’s business world. Fortunately, Henry Heinz himself showed that common sense, decency and social justice is a proven recipe for enduring business success.


Heinz - Tomato Ketchup Reduced Sugar - 13 oz. (369g)
Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Tbsp
Servings Per Container: About 23
Amount Per Serving %DV
Calories 5
Fat Calories 0
Total Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 190mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 1g 1%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 1g
Protein 0g
Vitamin A 2%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0%
Iron 0%
*Daily Value Not Established.
†Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your diet values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Other Ingredients: Tomato Concentrate from Red Ripe Tomatoes, Distilled Vinegar, Salt, Natural Flavoring, Onion Powder, Sucralose, Spice

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I've been buying this product since it came on the market, but it's no longer available locally. I've now got enough to last me a year.

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Manufacturer Info

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Pittsburgh, PA,
Phone: 1-800-255-5750 Visit website

About Heinz

About Heinz
The H.J. Heinz Company, headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is the most global of all U.S.-based food companies. Famous for our iconic brands on six continents, Heinz provides delicious, nutritious and convenient foods for families in 200 countries around the world. In more than 50 of those countries, we enjoy the number-one or number-two market position. Key Heinz markets are segmented as North American Consumer Products, U.S. Foodservice, Europe, Asia Pacific and Rest of World. Our commitment to providing a variety of wholesome foods, with an unwavering emphasis on health and wellness, makes Heinz like no other company on earth.


The First Name in Ketchup
Throughout the world, Heinz is synonymous with ketchup. We sell 650 million bottles of Heinz ketchup every year and approximately two single-serve packets of ketchup for every man, woman and child on the planet. For millions of families the world over, “if it isn’t Heinz, it isn’t ketchup.”


The Good Food Company
Beyond ketchup, Heinz also markets an ever-expanding selection of other great tasting foods. Our core products include ketchup, sauces, meals, snacks, and infant/nutrition. Among them are our 15 Power Brands, which comprise approximately 70% of our global sales. In short, Heinz is committed to enriching your family’s eating experience, whether you’re at home, dining out, or “on the go!”

Satisfying Tastes and Appetites Around the World
At any given moment, on any given continent, Heinz employees are hard at work...creating new products, perfecting fresh ideas, and developing nutritious and innovative foods for today's families. Heinz is a trusted name for consumers, a valued partner in the community, and a great investment with tremendous growth potential.

*The products and the claims made about specific products on or through this site have not been evaluated by LuckyVitamin.com or the United States Food and Drug Administration and are not approved to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.

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