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TCHO - Organic Classic Milk Chocolate Bar - 2 oz.
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  • Fair Trade
    Fair Trade

    Food or crafts that are produced under standards designed to prevent and end poverty, sweatshop labor conditions, and environmental degradation.

  • Gluten-Free
    Gluten-Free

    Excludes any ingredient that is a gluten-containing grain including wheat, barley, rye and triticale.

  • Kosher
    Kosher

    Complies with a strict policy of kosher food laws including cleanliness, purity and quality.

  • Organic
    Organic

    USDA certified organic foods are grown and processed according to federal guidelines.

TCHO - Organic Classic Milk Chocolate Bar - 2 oz.

By TCHO
Item #: 132038
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TCHO - Organic Classic Milk Chocolate Bar - 2 oz.

  • Item# :132038
    UPC# :812603012218
  • Brand:TCHO
  • Size/Form:2  oz.
  • Ship Weight:0.15
  • Servings:3

TCHO - Organic SeriousMilk Classic Milk Chocolate Bar - 2 oz. (58g)

TCHO Organic SeriousMilk Classic Milk Chocolate Meticulously crafted from the purest ingredients, TCHO’s SeriousMilk chocolates are an exploration of the rich flavors inherent in the milk chocolate tradition. TCHO's "Classic" bar has rich caramel notes, accented with hints of butterscotch, honey, and vanilla.

Frequently Asked Questions
What is TCHO?
A new way to think about chocolate, based on the pure flavors of cacao.

What does TCHO stand for?
Obsessively good chocolate, innovation in every aspect of their business, and making a better world.

How do you pronounce TCHO?
TCHO is pronounced “choh!” (the “t” is silent).

Where did the name TCHO come from?
The name TCHO is a phonetic spelling for the first syllable of chocolate.

What does it mean that TCHO is where “Silicon Valley start-up meets San Francisco food culture”?
There are many ways in which TCHO is where Silicon Valley start-up meets San Francisco food culture. To them, that means TCHO marries the relentless pursuit of innovation to the obsession with flavor and quality which are hallmarks of their region.

What does “New American Chocolate” mean?
New American Chocolate means bringing new thinking to an ancient food to create an exquisitely modern, and uniquely American experience, in much the way that the upstart Napa Valley changed people’s perception of American wine.

What is the difference between a Chocolatier vs Chocolate Maker?
TCHO is a chocolate maker, one of only about a dozen in the US with the scale to serve both consumers and commercial customers. They make their chocolate from scratch—sourcing their own cacao beans directly from growers, and then controlling every step of the process, from pod to palate. Chocolatiers purchase bulk chocolate from manufacturers (like TCHO) and artfully craft fine creations like truffles.

Are they local?
TCHO is the only chocolate manufacturer located in San Francisco.

Where can I buy TCHO?
Luckyvitamin.com

How do they make their chocolate?
They source their own cacao beans directly from farmers and control every step of the process from fermentation and roasting through conching, molding, and packaging. Their sourcing program is called TCHOSource.

What is their “Beta” program?
Just like with software development, they initially launched their bars in a Beta tasting program that is open to the public. They continually seek feedback from their Beta Tasters to improve their formulations. Thousands of people have contributed valuable feedback to help us arrive at their final formulations. Their first formulations went through over a thousand iterations based on this feedback, before finally being released as 1.0.

What is the Flavor Wheel all about?
TCHO’s flavor wheel represents the inherent flavors found in the cacao bean. They source their beans and tune them in processing so that their chocolates specifically express the flavors in their Flavor Wheel.

Why do they focus on flavor instead of “percentage cacao” or “origin?”
Both “percentage cacao” and “origin” can be misleading, if not meaningless, if you are looking to describe what chocolate tastes like. “Percentage cacao” refers to both cacao solids and cocoa butter, without indicating the proportion of either. A 70 percent cacao could have a majority of solids, or cocoa butter, with obviously different taste results since flavor is a result of the solids.

As to origin, cacao grown from plants on the same farm can vary wildly in flavor, for a variety of reasons, including harvest, genetics, or fermentation. Cacao in a growing region can be even more variable. A cacao from Madagascar, for example, may be fruity. Or, in the case of TCHO’s chocolate from Madagascar, citrus. Instead, TCHO decided to simplify the process of selecting your next chocolate by focusing on the inherent flavor of the beans.

What does it mean that TCHO is “pod to palate?”
TCHO makes its chocolate from cacao beans. They control every step of the chocolate-making from farm fermentation to consumer consumption. TCHOSource, their unique sourcing program, is the foundation for this process.

Are their products Organic?
Many of their products are Organic Certified:

  • PureNotes “Citrus”
  • PureNotes “Nutty”
  • PureNotes “Fruity”
  • SeriousMilk “Classic”
  • SeriousMilk “Cacao”
  • 99% Limited Edition
  • 39% Baking Discs
  • 66% Baking Discs
  • 99% Baking Discs
  • 66% TCHOPro

All of their products are sourced with their TCHOSource program.

Are their products fair trade?
Many of their products are Fair Trade, which means the cacao beans and the cocoa butter are from certified Fair Trade cocoa cooperatives:

  • PureNotes “Citrus”
  • PureNotes “Nutty”
  • PureNotes “Fruity”
  • SeriousMilk “Classic”
  • SeriousMilk “Cacao”
  • 99% Limited Edition
  • 39% Baking Discs
  • 66% Baking Discs
  • 99% Baking Discs
  • 66% TCHOPro

All of their products are sourced with their TCHOSource program.

What is Fair Trade?
Fair Trade is a social movement to organize farmers into co-ops with the goal of improving farmer lives. While they support increasing farmer income, co-ops are only one of the ways to do that. And some farms will simply never be Fair Trade — for example, larger plantations (like where they obtain their Madagascar “Citrus” cacao).

Why isn’t “Chocolatey” Organic or Fair Trade?
Ghana has a government-controlled cacao sector that has not supported certifications until fairly recently. One exception is Kuapa Kokoo, the only fair trade cacao cooperative in Ghana. However, they have not found samples with the quality they require yet, and they don’t produce organic cacao. Very recently, a very small organic cacao program has emerged in Ghana, and they are in direct contact with them (getting samples). So, they are currently testing organic beans from Ghana, for possible use in their “Chocolatey” in the future.

What do you mean their products are “beyond fair trade”?
For most companies, Fair Trade is essentially a royalty program, where they pay fair trade organizations for the use of the Fair Trade logo, with the royalty payment resulting in higher income for co-op farmers in the program. While TCHO supports fair trade, TCHOSource is based on the belief that in the 21st century, individuals and companies have the power and responsibility to act directly to make a better world.

TCHOSource is based on direct investments and direct involvement in improving farmer infrastructure through in-field remote monitoring, sensory analysis training, and technology transfer. They also install in-country Flavor Labs where producers taste chocolate they make from their own beans—an almost unheard of practice, until now. Such investments help farmers move out of commodity production to become premium flavor bean producers. Higher quality cacao allows farmers to earn better incomes and improve their living standards. Learn more about TCHOSource. TCHO firmly believes that the best, longest lasting change rests on the win-win of mutual self-interest—they get exceptional beans and the farmer gets better prices in the marketplace.

Is their chocolate single origin?
Their four PureNotes dark bars are single origin: “Chocolatey” is from Ghana; “Citrus” is from Madagascar; “Fruity” is from Peru; “Nutty” is from Ecuador. Their SeriousMilk “Classic” and “Cacao”, Baking Discs and TCHOPro (professional chocolate for the food service community) are blends.

What percentage of cacao is TCHO chocolate?
With the exception of their 99% Limited Edition, all of their dark bars (PureNotes) are between 65% and 70% Cacao. Their SeriousMilk “Classic” milk chocolate is 39% cacao. SeriousMilk “Cacao” milk chocolate is 53% cacao content.

Where do their beans come from?
PureNotes “Chocolatey” is from Ghana, “Citrus” is from Madagascar, “Fruity” is from Peru, and “Nutty” is from Ecuador. SeriousMilk “Classic” and “Cacao” are a blend of beans from Peru and Ecuador.

Are their professional blends single origin?
Their TCHOPro line offers blends so they are more consistent for industrial use. They offer 60.5% and 68% conventional blends and a 66% certified Organic Fair Trade blend. Learn more about TCHOPro.

Why don’t TCHO chocolates have inclusions (nuts/fruits)?
At the moment, they are focused on the pure inherent flavors of cacao, rather than added flavorings.

Does TCHO make Milk chocolate?
Yes. They currently make two SeriousMilk milk chocolates, “Classic” and “Cacao”.

What is the cloudy surface you sometimes see on chocolate bars?
This is “bloom”. Bloom occurs if the chocolate is heated enough to melt some of the cocoa butter in the chocolate. It generally does not affect the flavor of the chocolate, although it can make the chocolate feel dry/chalky.

What are the recommended storage temperatures for their chocolate?
Below 50% humidity and between 65F – 68F. They do not recommend storing TCHO in your refrigerator.

What is TCHOSource?
TCHOSource is the name of TCHO’s program to obtain the best beans in the world while enabling the producers of those beans to earn a better living. They do this by embracing as valued partners the farmers who grow their cacao—the way Napa Valley winemakers work closely with partner growers to foster best practices, and then buy their premium grapes at premium prices.

What is their relationship to the farmers who grow their cacao?
Great chocolate begins with great beans. And a modern company needs to be an agent of positive social change. TCHOSource is their response to both challenges. TCHOSource intelligently blends modern technology and field practice to help raise farmer income. They make direct farmer investments to improve fermentation and drying (literally the first steps in making chocolate) by:

  1. Redesigning fermenting processes
  2. Installing weather stations and data loggers
  3. Transferring Flavor Labs, to enable growers to make and taste chocolate for the first time
  4. Providing sensory acuity training to enable understanding and communication of flavor profiles.

TCHO firmly believes that the best, longest lasting change rests on the win-win of mutual self-interest—they get exceptional beans and the farmer gets better prices in the marketplace. TCHOSource is built on mutual self-interest: their need to secure long term sources of great cacao; and the growers’ need to raise their incomes.

What are TCHO Flavor Labs?
TCHOSource also partners with leading research organizations in cacao producing countries to deploy “Flavor Labs,” allowing farmers to make small batches of chocolate with their own cacao beans to better understand the core principle of TCHO chocolate: flavor. Timothy & John have installed several Flavor Labs in cocoa producing countries.

Why do you add “No slavery” on their package labels?
As a member of an industry where slavery exists, TCHO is taking a stand. They intend to raise consciousness about the reality of modern slavery in their industry and in the world, and set an example by refusing to use cacao produced by slaves. That’s why you will find “NO SLAVERY” on TCHO products.

Is their chocolate vegan?
All of TCHO’s dark chocolates are Vegan. There are no animal products in their dark chocolate. Their milk chocolates contain dairy.

Is their chocolate Gluten free?
Yes.

Is their chocolate kosher?
Yes. They have been certified by Earth Kosher.

I’m allergic to nuts, can I eat Nutty?
There are no nuts in Nutty. Nutty refers to the flavor of the cacao of itself. There’s also no fruit in “Fruity,” nor citrus in “Citrus.”

What does “possible traces of nuts and dairy” mean?
They include that in the packaging because they may come out with new products that use nuts. They currently produce milk chocolate in their facility so it is possible that traces of the milk may be left in their machines though they do a thorough cleansing between runs.

Who started TCHO?
Co-founded in 2005 by Timothy Childs, a NASA space shuttle contractor, and Karl Bittong, a 40-year chocolate industry veteran. In 2007, Wired co-founder Louis Rossetto joined TCHO as the CEO. In 2009, Jane Metcalfe, Wired’s other co-founder, joined as President.

What makes TCHO different?
TCHO is different in many ways:

  1. They have their own factory and make chocolate from scratch; they source their own cacao all over the world. They are one of only a dozen or so chocolate manufacturers with the scale to serve both consumers and commercial customers.
  2. As with wine, what you taste is precisely, and only, what’s in the bean itself.
  3. They are obsessive about quality; they are meticulous in their bean sourcing and scientifically exacting in their formulation development.
  4. They have a unique and innovative sourcing program, TCHOSource, that goes beyond Fair Trade — working directly with cacao farmers to improve their crops and livelihood. This program has already helped hundreds of farmers in Peru.
  5. They launch their bars in a “Beta” program. Feedback from their customers helps us refine formulations before final launch.
  6. They are a high end brand for Millennials — the next generation of chocolate enthusiasts.
  7. They have their own factory store located on the waterfront in downtown San Francisco.
  8. Their packaging is modern and iconic; they have won numerous design awards.
  9. The TCHO team includes chocolate and food enthusiasts with deep chocolate experience from industry leaders like Ghirardelli, Scharffen Berger, and Lake Champlain Chocolates.

What are TCHO’s values?

  1. Be obsessive about: Experience that delights, Legendary service to their communities, Innovation, Crisp execution and relentless. improvement.
  2. Be lean and mean, be real.
  3. Make a better world.
Be obsessive about: Experience that delights, Legendary service to their communities, Innovation, Crisp execution and relentless. improvement.
  • Be lean and mean, be real.
  • Make a better world.

    How do you make their chocolate?
    They source their own cacao beans and control the process from fermentation and roasting through conching, molding, and packaging.

    What is the capacity of the factory?
    Several thousand tons a year – joining only a dozen other major manufacturers in the US.

    No Slavery
    Unbelievably, in the 21st century, human slavery still exists on a large scale. And it exists in the chocolate industry that TCHO is a part of. In the African country of Ivory Coast, slaves—often young children sold by human traffickers—harvest cacao on plantations in conditions as bad as those in antebellum American South. Since 37 percent of the world’s supply of cacao comes from the Ivory Coast, a third of all chocolate may have been touched by slaves’ hands.

    As a member of this industry, TCHO is taking a stand against slavery. They intend to raise consciousness about the reality of modern slavery in our industry and in the world, and set an example by refusing to use cacao produced by slaves. That’s why you will find “NO SLAVERY” on every product TCHO makes.

    TCHO sources beans for “Chocolatey” from Ghana, Ivory Coast’s neighbor to the east. They have been concerned about Ghanain beans because old reports describe slavery as being practiced in “West Africa.” While that may have been true once, today it is certainly not true of Ghana.

    To be clear, throughout the Third World where it is grown, the cultivation of cacao is a hard life. In Ghana, for example, where most farms are smaller than 50 hectares and family-owned and operated, children are necessarily a part of farm life. In a developing country where 25% of the population lives on $1 per day or less, family economic necessity takes precedence.

    What goes on in the Ivory Coast is entirely different. Children are stolen from their homes in Benin, Burkino Faso, or Togo, and sold to Ivory Coast growers, where they are shackled, threatened, beaten, and, all too often, killed. The operations using slave labor are not family farms but large plantations, whose products are sold to global commodity traders and large European chocolate companies.

    When, in 1998, A UNICEF report first shed light on this exploitation, the companies buying slavery-tainted Ivory Coast cacao were forced to react. The Chocolate Manufacturers Association, composed of the biggest chocolate companies, set up a foundation in 2000 whose goal was to help eliminate slavery over the next five years. But eight years later there is still widespread slavery in the cacao fields of the Ivory Coast. A cynic might remark that their effort was cosmetic, a fig leaf to provide cover for practices which have not improved as they continue to purchase Ivorian cacao.

    TCHO believes that the most effective change comes from direct action. That is why we developed TCHOSource, to partner with growers and coops and transfer knowledge about growing and fermentation to enable farmers to become premium producers and create a relationship of mutual self-interest that goes beyond Fair Trade. It’s in the same spirit of working directly to make a better world that we are attempting to raise consciousness about slavery.

    Slavery is the basest violation of human dignity, a practice which we naively think was extinguished in the great abolition struggles of the 19th century. Instead, slavery continues to violently damage the lives of fellow humans from Ivory Coast to Sudan, from Haiti to India and Pakistan, from the Dominican Republic to China. According to Anti-Slavery International, over 27 million people—more than at any time in the past—are in bondage in the 21st century. They—and you—can make a difference. NO SLAVERY is part of TCHO’s mission to make a better world.

  • Ingredients

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    TCHO - Organic PureNotes Dark Chocolate with layers of Fruity Notes - 2 oz. (58g)
    Supplement Facts
    Serving Size: 0.7 oz (20g)
    Servings Per Container: 3
    Amount Per Serving %DV
    Calories 110
    Fat Calories 60
    Total Fat 7g 11%
    Saturated Fat 4.5g 22%
    Trans Fat 0g
    Cholesterol 0mg 0%
    Sodium 0mg 0%
    Total Carbohydrate 11g 4%
    Fiber 0g 0%
    Sugars 8g
    Protein 2g 4%
    Vitamin A 0%
    Vitamin C 0%
    Calcium 2%
    Iron 6%
    *Daily Value Not Established.
    †Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your diet values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
    Other Ingredients: Cacao beans, cane sugar, cocoa butter, soy lecithin, vanila beans.

    Manufacturer Info

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    Pier 17
    San Francisco, CA,
    Visit website

    About TCHO

    About TCHO
    Unbelievably, in the 21st century, human slavery still exists on a large scale. And it exists in the chocolate industry that TCHO is a part of. In the African country of Ivory Coast, slaves—often young children sold by human traffickers—harvest cacao on plantations in conditions as bad as those in antebellum American South. Since 37 percent of the world’s supply of cacao comes from the Ivory Coast, a third of all chocolate may have been touched by slaves’ hands.

    As a member of this industry, TCHO is taking a stand against slavery. We intend to raise consciousness about the reality of modern slavery in our industry and in the world, and set an example by refusing to use cacao produced by slaves. That’s why you will find “NO SLAVERY” on every product TCHO makes. TCHO sources beans for “Chocolatey” from Ghana, Ivory Coast’s neighbor to the east. We have been concerned about Ghanain beans because old reports describe slavery as being practiced in “West Africa.” While that may have been true once, today it is certainly not true of Ghana.

    To be clear, throughout the Third World where it is grown, the cultivation of cacao is a hard life. In Ghana, for example, where most farms are smaller than 50 hectares and family-owned and operated, children are necessarily a part of farm life. In a developing country where 25% of the population lives on $1 per day or less, family economic necessity takes precedence.

    What goes on in the Ivory Coast is entirely different. Children are stolen from their homes in Benin, Burkino Faso, or Togo, and sold to Ivory Coast growers, where they are shackled, threatened, beaten, and, all too often, killed. The operations using slave labor are not family farms but large plantations, whose products are sold to global commodity traders and large European chocolate companies.

    When, in 1998, A UNICEF report first shed light on this exploitation, the companies buying slavery-tainted Ivory Coast cacao were forced to react. The Chocolate Manufacturers Association, composed of the biggest chocolate companies, set up a foundation in 2000 whose goal was to help eliminate slavery over the next five years. But eight years later there is still widespread slavery in the cacao fields of the Ivory Coast. A cynic might remark that their effort was cosmetic, a fig leaf to provide cover for practices which have not improved as they continue to purchase Ivorian cacao.

    TCHO believes that the most effective change comes from direct action. That is why we developed TCHOSource, to partner with growers and coops and transfer knowledge about growing and fermentation to enable farmers to become premium producers and create a relationship of mutual self-interest that goes beyond Fair Trade. It’s in the same spirit of working directly to make a better world that we are attempting to raise consciousness about slavery.

    Slavery is the basest violation of human dignity, a practice which we naively think was extinguished in the great abolition struggles of the 19th century. Instead, slavery continues to violently damage the lives of fellow humans from Ivory Coast to Sudan, from Haiti to India and Pakistan, from the Dominican Republic to China. According to Anti-Slavery International, over 27 million people—more than at any time in the past—are in bondage in the 21st century. We—and you—can make a difference. NO SLAVERY is part of TCHO’s mission to make a better world.

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